Independence

 

The blue coats the white like the water coats the earth, covering it with beauty. The China is about to get thrown away, the Liberation China I thought it. My mother bought it after she moved out of her old life. Her old life most would consider hell, 3 jobs, 2 full time, 1 part-time. Learning at college full time and raising 3 boys. She bought the china to feel special, to make her life even more special then it was. I loved the way the images sucked you in, a man in a coolie hat fishing, his face a blur among the deep blue. The way the pole arched down as though a fish was forever caught in its hook of menace, almost free but the line keeping it on a leash. Stuck looking at his world from the inside out. My eyes trace along to the cups a whale jumping out looking from his world to ours, the lines of his body look like the waves he will never return to, his tail flicking out behind him, a protest to the winds that blow around it. A boat below, the simple sailor’s arms raised in shock of the fantastic beast above them. Then comes the bowl, another part of the china set. it’s simple shape giving way to the long fields sculpted around it. The trees so full in shades of blue, birds twittering with worms hanging from their mouths. And my eyes fade on the sun, despite being made of blue and white it shines brighter than a thousand of itself.

I am drawn to this object, not unlike a moth is to a flame. It is a piece of history in my family’s tree, one that was about to be thrown away. I saved it, knowing that one day I will enjoy it greatly. I remember looking at it as a child, my large clumsy hands kept far down at my sides. It was always so high up on the shelves, a sapphire kept away from peasants unworthy of its sight, resting upon a mountain it’s shimmer always reminding them it was there. There was always a single day one of the biggest dishes was brought down, to bear  Thanksgiving. Beets, sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, sweet ham, and divine turkey. And somehow the platter always held my attention. It’s crisp blues and whites reminding me of dress whites my brothers wear when they come home from long months at sea. This object has face value to others because it’s nice china. But for me I feel drawn to it, it’s majesty unmatched.

It was a long weekend, the year of 2018, during the summer. One of those weekends that is spent cleaning. The heat from the sun-baked through the house heating the inside like a pot set to boil. The only reprieve was the rooms on the far side of the house untouched by the sun. that included the back room we use for storage. My mom and I were going through the room, the smell of cardboard boxes and dust permeating my nostrils.  The musk of age and time revolving around my nose, keeping me grounded to where I was. The burning season, we were throwing stuff away, intense physical labor during the hottest part of the year. I lift up yet another box, preparing to go out into the sun. Its spiny daggers of light and heat felt even in shade. I step into the light and it feels like my skin it’s ripping itself apart to escape the light. I toss the box into our truck and step back into the house, the internal temperature hardly cooler than outside. My mom is about to hand me a box from the kitchen, it contents rattling. “What’s in this?”

“China,” she replied unaware. I open it up and I am taken aback. It’s my favorite china. The cool blues peer up at me like a dog whose owner is holding a bowl of food. I ask my mom if I can keep it, she says of course. So we keep it in the box, it’s beauty perserved.

School has started for about two weeks now, my mind slowly getting sharpened from it’s presence in my mind. My mom is driving the headlights carving a path through the darkness weighing down on the car. The inside smells of some rotting vegetable, probably because my sister left her food in the car. The air up this high is dry, mimicking all of California as it’s dryness claws its way into my mouth. The headlights flashes back at us, another mile marker flies by, swallowed once again by the ever hungry darkness. My mom asks me the usual, ‘how is my day’, ‘why’. I tell her I am writing about her china. She smiles her smile as faint darkness in her eye as she recalls all that’s happened in her life. When she speaks her voice is clear, a shout down through a valley.

“I bought that china when I moved to my new house with your brothers. I bought them to make me and your brothers special, this beautiful china matching how I felt, Despite being a single mother of three boys, working 3 jobs and going to school. This china set let me have independence, it wasn’t just china, it was something more. Your brother Robert also liked the china, the plates especially. When they all broke except one he would always want that one. I am glad you want them.” We pull into our driveway pebbles shattering under the 1.5 tons of weight put on them. I am deep in thought as I go through the routine, getting mail, feeding goats, letting my dog out. I am thinking could I feel the independence, something I am seeking in my life.

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Find your joy!

This weekend my teammates and I spent it building bonds,fixing arms and finding what brings us joy! Thanks to our sponsor Lockheed Martin for supporting us and coming to the competition to talk with us.

group hand fist bump

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

I am so lucky to go to a school that promotes your passions. It has given me the opportunity to expand what I know, be curious for what I want to know and most importantly to give and share my joy and passion for serving others!

FLL is a way I can pay it forward to younger kids and their love of Legos. It introduces them to STEM and teaches them team work. I spent a weekend at the kick off event on the Midway. What a great and awesome background for sharing what I love.

I am encouraging you to find what your joy is! Do it, do it often! Use it to inspire change in others! Use it to inspire change in you!

 

please meet

This is where I am everyday till 10 pm
Introducing  my tweam and our robot!
2018 SAN DIEGO REGIONAL WINNERS

Team 1538 / The Holy Cows, along with Alliance Captain 2659 – RoboWarriors and fellow Hall of Fame member 597 – The Wolverinesproud  were the 2018 San Diego Regional champions!

check out our stats watch a video of our win

https://www.thebluealliance.com/team/1538

Daisy Yoshimi
2018 FIRST ROBOT

Daisy Yoshimi

Designed for the 2018 FIRST Robotics game, FIRST POWER UP.

Hope is still Alive!

in 2012 I was honored to be chosen as the Operation Homefront Navy Military Child of the Year. I was able to visit Dc and saw a lot of Hope in the other awardees.Now 6 years later my little sister has this same honor. She is pretty amazing and sometimes a huge pain. I look at all the things that  she does and she inspires me and offers hope to do many people.i can’t be in dC with her becuase of Robotics but she makes me super proud!

The 6 other military kids are just as inspiring.Follow them athursday and see their stories!

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10156389171744884&substory_index=0&id=186001529883

Hope comes in all shapes, sizes acts of kindness but in our house it comes in the shape of a cupcake.(see Isabelle)

What Inspires You?

As I sit in my humanities class writing during some chaos! My school as amazing as it is , is on alert, police line the street in front of our school a security officer walks our halls (something that never happened in all the years the school exists) And a threat, whether it be a bad joke or a real threat now exists in my world. It is making me wonder What inspires you!

what inspires us to do good, do bad or do nothing at all!

My Momma and Dada say to me and my brothers and sister all the time “Be Inspired!”

I am realizing as I get older this means different things to different people. As military kids I think we got a huge gift from my Dada. It came wrapped and beautifully presented to us on the day we were born into this military Brats life. It was the gift of true grit! What was in that beautiful gift …. a huge empty box, but the learned ability that my siblings and I could fill it how we choose. We could take all the experiences we have as military kids, good challenging, ugly and beautiful and make them into what inspires us to be great!

I am not gonna lie we have a pretty positive family and that helps. But taking that true grit and using it to inspire your self and others can make the difference between being ordinary and great! It can be used to help inspire change ! It can be used to inspire others to make change! It can be used to impact the lives of others!

My Pops has deployed almost as many times as I have years on this earth. My big brothers are half that but the stories they tell us when they come home make that time apart a learning adventure. The challenges and positives inspire me to pass that true grit on.

We are safe in our bubble our teachers, advisors, police and our parents give us this gift today. But don’t wait to use your true grit. Inspire someone today!

What inspires you?

 

MCOY18 Finalists announced

Operation Homefront announced its Top Five finalists for MCOY 18. Congrats to all these awesometacular military kids! Inspire change and make the world a better place!

a special shout out to my little sister! You change the way people live everyday!The families and warriors you touch show how much we all appreciate them. Your Dove campaign has hanged our village of schools to empower girls to be strong and confident! For a little sister your ok!

super proud brother !

Congratulations to the top 5 finalists for 2018 Military Child of the Year® Award!

Six Military Child of the Year® Award recipients will represent each branch of the armed forces — the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and National Guard — for their scholarship, volunteerism, leadership, extracurricular involvement, and other criteria while facing the challenges of military family life. The seventh award is the Military Child of the Year® Award for Innovation presented by global technology and consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton. This award goes to a military child who has designed a bold and creative solution to address a local, regional or global challenge.

The Military Child of the Year® Award for Innovation recipient will work directly with a Booz Allen Hamilton team to develop a plan to help scale the recipient’s project — drawing on technology and strategic thinking as a part of the corporation’s competitive Summer Games.

The following are the 2018 Military Child of the Year® Award finalists by service branch. Finalists for the 2018 Military Child of the Year® Award for Innovation are also designated:

Air Force

Eve Glenn, 16, Tampa, FL (Glenn is also one of 4 finalists for the Military Child of the Year® Award for Innovation)

Hannah Cheater, 17, Las Vegas, NV

Benjamin Rawald, 15, Del Rio, TX

Braden Westby, 18, Vilonia, AR

Madison Williams, 18, Monument, CO

Army

Rachel Ball, 17, Springfield, VA

Elizabeth Clinger, 17, Colorado Springs, CO

Hunter Hotaling, 16, Lansing, KS

Bryce Kim, 17, El Paso, TX

Rebekah Paxton, 17, Harrisonville, MO

Coast Guard

Allison Brozusky, 17, Middletown, RI

Roark Corson, 17, Virginia Beach, VA

Mattie Gross, 16, Kodiak, AK

Gabriel Niles, 15, Bennington, VT

Cody Watson, 18, Tuttle, OK

Marine Corps

William Butler, 16, Virginia Beach, VA

Katelyn Francis, 17, Havelock, NC

Joshua Frawley, 14, Jacksonville, NC

Taylor Pokorney, 17, Albany, OR

Elena Polinski, 17, Moundsville, WV (Polinski is also one of 4 finalists for the Military Child of the Year® Award for Innovation)

National Guard

Madisyn Clark, 17, Peoria, AZ

Aaron Hall, 16, Coarsegold, CA

Aiden Hunter, 16, Onalaska, WA

Koralys Rodriguez, 17, Statesville, NC

Jessica Walker, 17, Blanding, UT

Navy

Sidney Brown, 17, Wiggins, MS

James Cosman, 13, Quantico, VA

Elisabeth Lundgren, 17, Chula Vista, CA

Isabelle Richards, 13, Jamul, CA

Madison Walker, 17, Virginia Beach, VA

Innovation Finalists

Eve Glenn, 16, Air Force, Tampa, FL

Shelby Barber, 17, Air Force, Ewa Beach, HI

Elena Polinski, 17, Marine Corps, Moundsville, WV

Gavin Sylvia, 18, Army, Fort Campbell, KY

The finalists were selected by an independent panel of judges. The final award recipients for each branch of service will be announced in early March.

The Military Child of the Year® Award reflects the positive impact that these special young people have made on their military families, their schools, and their communities. The final seven award recipients will travel to Washington, D.C., to be recognized at the April 19 gala, during which senior leaders of each branch of service will present the awards. They also will each receive $10,000, a laptop computer, and other donated gifts.

2018 marks the 10th anniversary of this special event — the nation’s premier celebration of the achievements of our military children.

 

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